“As long as I pursue upcycling, I am dealing with limited resources. And we reach our goal when there is nothing to be upcycled.”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn
Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“I wanted to turn abandoned kimono into “raw material” which gives everyone a chance to play with.”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“People from all over the world can use it. They can choose to use just a bit. They can knit or crochet. It really depends on how people use them.”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“Upcycling” in Japan

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“Kimono Yarn Kakeru”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“I wanted to see the reactions of people from abroad.”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn
Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“Nunobana”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“Engawa Art Project”

Photo courtesy of Kimono Yarn

“Though, usually 80% of the shops are closed, on the day, the arcade was full of kids! I was like, huh, people would come if something was going on”

“Mottainai is mottainai.”

“When I look at kimono even the ones that were to be thrown away, I think “kawaii”and they give me happiness. That’s exactly the feeling of mottainai! I hope someday I manage to bring all of these kimono back to my studio and make more kimono yarn with them.”

International_Eco-Friendly_Almost Vegan_Actress_Free spirit following curiosity. I also write about artisans mostly from Japan who specialises in upcycling:)